Educational Strategy

 

Provide training to city officials responsible for lakes related ordinances and management.

Audience

Zoning administrator

Zoning board of appeals

Planning commission

Lake district board of commissioners

Messages

  • Protecting lake ecosystems is good for the economy of Shell Lake.
  • Policy makers need to protect the public interest including water resources.
  • The components of the zoning ordinance need to be understood and enforced.
  • Existing limits to hard surface areas that drain into the lakes are important to enforce.
  • Grading and fill laws are important to enforce.

Activities

Certification and training process for zoning officials

Financial support for training

Workshops and tours

Meetings and forums

Letters

 

Provide educational programs for lake residents and users

Audience

Lakeshore property owners

Residents of the City of Shell Lake

Visiting recreational users

Messages

  • Individual lakeshore management practices affect the lakes’ water quality and ecosystems.
  • The city’s lakes belong to everyone, and we all have a vested interest in preserving water quality and access to these lakes.

RE:  Water Quality

  • Encourage construction and vegetation best management practices
  • Maintain/restore vegetated buffer strips
  • Discourage the use of phosphorus fertilizers
  • Encourage citizens to report violations regarding wastewater dumping.  It is illegal to dump gray water (define).
  • Minimize hard surface areas that drain into the lake

RE:  Habitat

  • Remove Eurasian water milfoil fragments
  • Encourage residential/industrial/farm use of “environmentally friendly” products and chemicals in day-to-day operations
  • Importance of aquatic vegetation and slow/no wake zone in south bay area of Shell Lake

RE:  Scenic Beauty

  • There are dock limits in state law.
  • Screening structures with vegetation and building structures further from the water enhances natural scenic beauty.

RE:  Recreation

  • State boating laws regulate boating safety through slow-no wake zones near shore, other boats, and personal watercraft.  Lighting and other safety requirements exist for watercraft.
  • Be considerate of other users.

Activities

Shell Lake/Washburn County Development Guide (modeled on Burnett County’s)

Boat landing signs

Column, news releases in Washburn County Register, The Laker

Regular feature, news releases on local radio (WCSW/WGMO)

Newsletter

Mailings

Annual meeting

Neighbor-to-neighbor outreach

Involve youth and adult service organizations

Distribute existing videos/brochures/information

Action Plan

A plan of action is outlined in Appendix A.  It lists responsible and cooperating parties for each plan activity, a timeline for completion, and potential funding sources.  The plan of action should be reviewed each year and modified as necessary.

Implementation Recommendations

Form an at-large committee with representatives from key county/state/federal agencies whose decisions and projects affect city lakes.                                                                                            

Hold Lake District Board of Commissioners meetings quarterly to address public concerns.  These meetings should be well-publicized.

Recruit volunteers to take responsibility for activities in the educational strategy such as news releases, newspaper columns, and a newsletter.

Future of the Lake Protection Advisory Committee

The ongoing role of the group should be to provide information and education to the public.  The education strategy should encourage broader public participation in lake protection activities and practices and methods to help individuals be more aware of lakeshore management practices and the lawful and ethical responsibilities of enjoying our lakes. 

The committee should also assist with the implementation phase of the Lake Management Plan by gathering information for the city council and other decision-makers and by tracking progress of plan activities.

APPENDIX A:  PLAN OF ACTION

Activity

Lead Responsible Party

Cooperators

Timeline

Potential Funding Sources

Develop land use plan

Planning Commission

City Council

2002

WI Office of Land Information Services

DNR Lake Protection

Complete aerial photography

City Council

Planning Commission

2001

WI Office of Land Information Services

Water level alternatives

Lake Level Committee

City Council

Ongoing

DNR Lake Planning Grant

Evaluate zoning ordinances

City Council

LPAC

2001

DNR Lake Planning Grant

Evaluate no-wake ordinances

City Council

LPAC

2000

DNR Lake Planning Grant

Evaluate lake access points

City Council

LPAC

2002

DNR Lake Planning Grant

Evaluate public marina w/fuel

City Council

Planning Commission

2001

DNR Lake Planning Grant

Monitor water clarity

Volunteers

LPAC

Ongoing

DNR Self-help Monitoring

Monitor for exotic species

Volunteers

LPAC

Ongoing

DNR Self-help Monitoring

Educational Activities

       

Shoreland Development Guide

LPAC

Northwest Regional Planning/Washburn County

2001

DNR Lake Planning Grant

Zoning training

City Council

LPAC

Ongoing

 

Lakeshore resident education

LPAC

City Council

Volunteers

   

APPENDIX B.  Glossary

ALGAE:

A group of microscopic, photosynthetic water plants. Algae give off oxygen during the day as a product of photosynthesis and consume oxygen during the night as a result of respiration. Therefore, algae affect the oxygen content of water. Nutrient-enriched water increases algae growth.

BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (BMPs):

The most effective, practical measures to control nonpoint sources of pollutants that run off from land surfaces. 

BUFFER STRIPS: 

Strips of grass, shrubs, trees, and other vegetation between disturbed areas and a stream, lake, or wetland.

EROSION:

The wearing away of the land surface by wind or water.

EUTROPHIC:

Refers to a nutrient-rich lake.  Large amounts of algae and weeds characterize a eutrophic lake (see also "Oligotrophic" and "Mesotrophic").   

EUTROPHICATION:

The process of nutrient enrichment of a lake leading to increased production of aquatic organisms.  Eutrophication can be accelerated by human activities such as agriculture and improper waste disposal.

FECAL COLIFORM:

A group of bacteria used to indicate the presence of other bacteria that cause disease. The number of coliform is particularly important when water is used for drinking and swimming.

 HABITAT:

The place or type of site where a plant or animal naturally lives and grows.

MACROPHYTE:

A rooted aquatic plant.

MESOTROPHIC:

Refers to a moderately fertile nutrient level of a lake between the oligotrophic and eutrophic levels.  (See also "Eutrophic" and "Oligotrohpic.")   

MITIGATION:

The effort to lessen the damages from a particular project through modifying a project, providing alternatives, compensating for losses, or replacing lost values.

NONPOINT SOURCE POLLUTION (NSP):

Pollution whose sources cannot be traced to a single point such as a municipal or industrial wastewater treatment plant discharge pipe. Nonpoint sources include eroding farmland and construction sites, urban streets, and barnyards. Pollutants from these sources reach water bodies in runoff, which can best be controlled by proper land management.

OLIGOTROPHIC:

Refers to an unproductive and nutrient-poor lake. Such lakes typically have very clear water.  (See also "Eutrophic" and "Mesotrophic.")

ORDINARY HIGH WATER MARK:

The point on the bank or shore up to which the water leaves a distinct mark on the shore or bank from its presence, wave action, or flow. The mark may be indicated by erosion, destruction of or change in vegetation, or another easily recognizable characteristic.

PESTICIDE:

Any chemical agent used to control specific organisms, such as insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, etc.

PHOSPHORUS:

A nutrient that, when reaching lakes in excess amounts, can lead to over-fertile conditions and algae blooms.

POINT SOURCES:

Sources of pollution that have discrete discharges, usually from a pipe or outfall.

POLLUTION:

The presence of materials or energy whose nature, location, or quantity produces undesired environmental effects.

PRODUCTIVITY:

A measure of the amount of living matter which is supported by an environment over a specific period of time. Often described in terms of algae production for a lake.

RUNOFF:

Water from rain, snowmelt, or irrigation that flows over the ground surface and returns to streams and lakes. Runoff can collect pollutants from air or land and carry them to receiving waters.  

SEDIMENT:

Soil particles suspended in and carried by water as a result of erosion.   

SEPTIC SYSTEM:

Sewage treatment and disposal for homes not connected to sewer lines. Usually the system includes a tank and drain field.  Solids settle to the bottom of the tank. Liquid percolates through the drain field.

STORM SEWERS:

A system of sewers that collect and transport rain and snow runoff. In areas that have separated sewers, such stormwater is not mixed with sanitary sewage.

TROPHIC STATUS:

The level of growth or productivity of a lake as measured by phosphorus content, algae abundance, and depth of light penetration.

VARIANCE:

Government permission for a delay or exception in the application of a given law, ordinance, or regulation.  Also, see water quality standard variance.

WASTE:

Unwanted materials left over from manufacturing processes; refuse from places of human or animal habitation.

WETLANDS:

Areas that are inundated or saturated by surface or groundwater at a frequency and duration sufficient to support a variety of vegetative or aquatic life. Wetland vegetation requires saturated or seasonally saturated soil conditions for growth and reproduction. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas.